New Mexico's Pet ResourceSUMMER 2006


REGIONAL AND STATE
ANIMAL NEWS AND VIEWS

ALBUQUERQUE CAT ACTION TEAM (A.C.A.T.)

Ongoing: February 2006-February 2007
Pennies for Purrs: A Million Meows
OUR GOAL: ONE MILLION PENNIES IN ONE YEAR!

June: Ticket sales begin for the Annual A.C.A.T. Raffle.
Tickets will be available on Saturdays at PETCO, at all A.C.A.T. events or from any A.C.A.T. member.
The raffle pull will be on November 11, 2006 at PETCO during the A.C.A.T. clinic.

Saturday, July 15, 2006: Raqs-A-Paw Shimmy-a-thon
1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Family Focus Center, 441 Monroe NE, Albuquerque, NM. A.C.A.T. will sponsor the first ever Guinness World Record Shimmy Attempt.

Proceeds benefit the homeless cats and kittens of New Mexico.


WATERMELON MOUNTAIN RANCH ANIMAL CENTER SUMMER EVENTS

JAZZ FOR PEACE in Albuquerque
Benefit Concert for the Animals
June 23rd  Details at:  
www.wmranch.org
Call 505-850-2578 for tickets $25/person
www.jazzforpeace.org

July 22nd Mutt Strut and Pancake Breakfast at
Watermelon Mountain Ranch Animal Center in Rio Rancho
Fun for the whole family and especially for Fido.
Visit our web site for further details

Watermelon Mountain Ranch Animal Center Animal Adoptions in Santa Fe at  Zoe and Guido’s   Pet Boutique  July 23rd  
Paseo de Peralta and Cerrillos  10 – 3 p.m.    505-988-2500

Watermelon Mountain Ranch Animal Center presents it’s Fall Dog Washes at Bow Wow Blues in Albuquerque
Aug 5th, 19th and Sept. 9th
3845 Rio Grande Blvd   505-341-4484

Bernalillo Wine Festival Sept. 2-4  Stop by for some ice-cold watermelon from your friends at
Watermelon Mountain Ranch Animal Center.


KINDRED SPIRITS ANIMAL SANCTUARY SUMMER/FALL EVENT SCHEDULE

Eldercare & Hospice for Dogs, Horses & Poultry
3749-A Highway 14, Santa Fe, NM 87508
505-471-5366
www.kindredspiritsnm.com

July 29th, Sat. Evening
Benefit Art Show

Sept 30-Oct. 1, Sat. & Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Fall Open House


2006 NEW MEXICO’S WEEK FOR THE ANIMALS BACK ON THE PLAZA

During the week of September 17-23, 2006, animal welfare organizations from throughout the state are coming together to celebrate the furred, feathered, and scaly friends that make our lives brighter and better.

Special events will be held statewide, beginning with a proclamation from Governor Bill Richardson.  From adoption fairs to children’s art contests, from humane education classes, seminars and lectures to low-cost spaying and neutering services, it’s a week full of animal activities for the whole family.

The week will conclude Saturday, September 23, 2006 with a special event on the Plaza, from 11a.m.-3 p.m.  Previous Plaza events have included wolves, snakes,and bats along with representatives from shelters and animal organizations throughout Northern New Mexico.  This year’s event will also include a variety of interesting presentations every half hour, throughout the day.

For more information or to get your organization involved, please call PAWS at 505-466-1525 or log onto the New Mexico’s Week for the Animals web site at www.animalweek.org


CHECK OUT NORTH AMERICA’S FASTEST GROWING DOG SPORT --- FLYBALL --- AT THE RIO RANCHO ROADRUNNER RALLY FLYBALL TOURNAMENT (photo of Abby, rescued dog, in Albuquerque)

Albuquerque’s very own High Desert Sundogs Flyball Racing Club will be hosting New Mexico’s First Flyball tournament, September 30 – October 1, 2006.

Racing will commence at 8:00 a.m. at the Rio Rancho Sports Complex, 3501 High Resort Blvd. Rio Rancho, NM 87124.

Flyball is a fast-paced ball retrieval relay race for dogs. Teams from all over the southwest will be racing head to head to try and break the world Flyball record with their four-legged athletes. It’s going to be an exciting weekend of racing! Come out and support New Mexico’s dogs.

For additional tournament information, or to learn more about how you can participate in Flyball, please check out our web site at www.highdesertsundogs.com


HOMELESS DOGS & CATS NOT FORGOTTEN BY LAWMAKERS
Legislators give over $3 million for animal shelters and spay/neuter projects

by Danielle Bays

The importance of spaying and neutering dogs and cats wasn’t lost on our state legislators this year. Governor Bill Richardson signed budget bills that directed $880,000 specifically to creating spay/neuter clinics, plus an additional $400,000 to fund spay/neuter projects. A further $1,870,000 was allocated to local governments for improvements to animal shelters and animal control facilities.

Money to purchase an Albuquerque-based mobile spay/neuter clinic ($250,000) was included in the list of approved capital outlay projects requested by legislators. Another $630,000 has been set aside to construct a spay/neuter clinic in the City of Albuquerque, which also garnered $200,000 for shelter improvements. The planning for the spay/neuter clinic is in the early stages and is part of Albuquerque’s commitment to becoming a “live exit” city within the next five years.

Both the stationary and mobile spay/neuter clinics are expected to impact animals from an area radiating beyond the city limits. Currently, 30% of the animals that end up at the two Albuquerque Animal Care Centers come from neighboring communities.

In addition to the capital outlay money, the state budget included $400,000 for spay/neuter projects across the state. This money would be granted to local governments so that they could provide spay/neuter services in their communities. The State is in the process of determining how this money will be allocated and who will implement the grant process.

More funding for animal shelters
Construction or improvements was funded for shelters in Aztec ($500,000), Bayard ($110,000), Chama ($125,000), Hobbs ($500,000), Portales ($190,000) and Taos ($25,000). Animal control vehicles and equipment was funded for Acoma Pueblo ($20,000), Dona Ana ($130,000), Grants ($30,000) and Torrance ($40,000).

The money for these brick & mortar type improvements comes from what is known as “capital outlay,” a pool of money from which state legislators fund local projects. Usually several lawmakers from a community join together in requesting the funding, often for a sum much higher than is finally approved by the legislature and signed by the governor. Money for capital outlay is drawn from the state’s general fund as well as from state tax bonds.

Animal shelters across the state are encouraged to talk to their state senators and representatives about securing capital outlay money for their local shelters.

Danielle Bays is a lifelong animal advocate and a partner with Animal Vision Consulting LLC, a firm dedicated to working with non-profits and government entities to improve the lives of animals. She can be reached at djbays@earthlink.net.


WELCOME TO NEW MEXICO. SOON TO BE THE ONLY STATE WITH LEGAL COCKFIGHTING. NOT ENCHANTING.

By a vote of 30-4, the Louisiana Senate voted to ban cockfighting in late May, agreeing that illegal gambling, the threat of avian flu, and cruelty to animals were not what their state should be known for. At the time we went to press, the House was scheduled to vote on the bill. If it becomes law, New Mexico will be the only state that does not have a statewide cockfighting ban, although local ordinances currently prohibit the blood “sport” in 13 of 33 counties. Under the Louisiana law, cockfighting would be included in the state ban against cruelty to animals and violators would face fines of up to $1,000 and up to six months in jail.


PROGRESS ON FEDERAL BILLS

The Animal Fighting Prohibition Enforcement Act, which strengthens the federal penalties for illegal cockfighting, dogfighting and hog-dog fighting, has passed the Senate and is currently in House committee. Please write to your representative to vote for this bill.

In May, an amendment to a Department of the Interior spending bill that restored federal protections for wild horses and burros and barred their commercial sale and slaughter for exported food was passed unanimously in the U.S. House. But more needs to be done. Let your representatives know you support H.R. 503 and S. 1915, which ban horse slaughter once and for all.

In a landslide vote, the House passed the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards (PETS) Act. This act requires state and local emergency agencies to consider the needs of people with pets and service animals in a major disaster. Please write your senators to vote for S. 2548, the Senate version.

The Captive Primate Safety Act, which would end the interstate and foreign commerce in captive primates for the pet trade, was unanimously approved by a Senate committee and is scheduled to go to the full Senate for a vote. Let your senators know you support this.

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